INA Archives – Institute of Nautical Archaeology https://nauticalarch.org Institute of Nautical Archaeology Thu, 07 Dec 2017 19:17:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.1 From the INA Vault: Clydesdale Plantation wreck https://nauticalarch.org/from-the-ina-vault-clydesdale-plantation-wreck/ Sun, 28 Aug 2016 19:38:20 +0000 http://nauticalarch.org/?p=8914 The Clydesdale Plantation wreck was discovered in the fall of 1991 during a survey of the Back River, a secondary channel of the Savannah River. The vessel in the photos was one of 19 derelicts discovered during the survey, along with the remains of numerous 19th-century wharves and buildings.  Visit the Clydesdale Plantation 18th-Century Sloop Excavation webpage to learn more!

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Photos:

Top Left: Project Director Fred Hocker oversees the excavation.

Top Right: The team makes a game plan for the day.

Bottom: Inspecting the newly uncovered fromes and ceiling planking.

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INA Archives Receives New Top-of-the-Line Scanner! https://nauticalarch.org/ina-archives-receives-new-top-of-the-line-scanner/ Wed, 03 Aug 2016 19:35:21 +0000 http://nauticalarch.org/?p=8899 Included with the scanner donation was an orange "Septipus" (he only has 7 legs), who now presides over the digitization efforts.

Included with the scanner donation was an orange “Septipus” (he only has 7 legs), who now presides over the digitization efforts.

Due to the generosity of Dr. Hayes W. Caldwell, M.D. & Mrs. Margaret H. Caldwell, the INA Archives has received a new Epson Perfection V800 Scanner, to be used in conjunction with their previous scanner donation. The Archives Digitization Project has benefited greatly from the purchase of these scanners which allow us to preserve digitally a wealth of irreplaceable documents, photographs, and negatives. The INA Archives can now produce incredibly high resolution scans, making a priceless primary record available for future generations. Additionally, the new scanner uses an LED light-source; as the LED bulbs do not produce heat, the machine can be used to scan even the more delicate items in the INA Archives. Currently digitization efforts are focused on the Peter Throckmorton Collection. If you are interested in learning more about the Archives Digitization Project or would like to donate, just email our Archivist McKenzie Alford: archvist@nauticalarch.org.

Check out just a few of the stunning images these scanners have brought back to life:

Image 3 mapping the site Image 5 Documenting the excavation Image 1 downline

INA Interns clean and conserve film positives and negatives prior to scanning.

INA Interns clean and conserve film positives and negatives prior to scanning.

These images were taken during the Cape Gelidonya Late Bronze Age Shipwreck Excavation and document the birth of the field of underwater archaeology. Never before had scientific excavation techniques been implemented below the waves. The INA Archives is devoted to preserving not only this important event in history, but also the continuation of that legacy in projects going on around the world today!

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Voyage from Antiquity Film now in HD https://nauticalarch.org/voyage-from-antiquity-film-now-in-hd/ Mon, 11 Jul 2016 17:57:35 +0000 http://nauticalarch.org/?p=8469 The original motion picture polyester film of Voyage from Antiquity has been re-scanned to HD quality. This two hour documentary explores the excavation of the Late Bronze Age shipwreck at Uluburun, Turkey, excavated from 1984-1994 with more than 22,000 dives logged in depths in excess of 150 feet. The find proved to be an elite shipment from the Late Bronze Age, providing precious archaeological evidence for the exotic and valuable gifts exchanged by kings, heads of state, or wealthy merchants.  Produced by Jack Kelley.  Watch the trailer now!

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New Addition to the Throckmorton Archives Collection https://nauticalarch.org/new-addition-to-the-throckmorton-archives-collection/ Fri, 01 Jul 2016 18:50:53 +0000 http://nauticalarch.org/?p=8358 img-160701132451-0002This spring, a chance airport meeting brought together INA veteran Robin Piercy & John Marshall.  John Marshall was the 1965 expedition photographer at Torre Sgarrata and then at Lago di Bolsena with Peter Throckmorton.  Marshall has generously donated his collection of negatives, contacts and prints from these projects to the INA Archives.  The collection is currently undergoing digitization in efforts to preserve this important historical record.  Enjoy a few of the images from the collection!  Learn more about key INA figures such as Robin Piercy & Peter Throckmorton here.

 

 

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INA’s Motion Picture Film Collection https://nauticalarch.org/inas-motion-picture-film-collection/ Mon, 29 Feb 2016 22:02:50 +0000 http://nauticalarch.org/?p=7663 filmcoresslide

INAA holds a significant film collection, both moving image and still.  According to the most recent inventory, there are 479 cores of moving picture film and over 40,000 slides.  The moving image film collection is comprised of mainly 18 mm polyester film, lengths of which range from 50 to 400 feet.  These films document some of the earliest scientific achievements in underwater archaeology.

Current Projects

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Meg Hagseth Installing the Shelves of the New Film Refrigeration Units.  Polyester Motion Picture Film should be stored in a cool environment with a low relative humidity.

This fall, the INA Archives received two brand new top-quality commercial refrigerators to store hundreds of reels of decades-old archival film. The two units were provided to INA by the College of Liberal Arts at Texas A&M University, and will soon house INA’s collection of over 400 cores of polyester motion picture film. This important footage documents INA shipwreck excavations including those at Uluburun and Yassıada, Turkey. Thanks to College Dean Pamela Matthews for helping INA preserve this priceless, irreplaceable footage documenting some of the earliest scientific achievements in underwater archaeology. The process of cleaning, cataloging, and moving the film to cold storage has already begun, updates of our progress will be posted here

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Intern Jess Conklin cleans the film Ancient Mariners.

Intern Jess Conklin cleans the film with a non-wax cleaner and cotton pads to remove any dust.  Using a digital microscope, she checks the film for sprocket hole damage, splice condition, and warping or delamination of the film.  The Archives workroom has been outfitted with a pair of rewinds and a lightbox to make handling the film easier.  Each film will be cleaned, cataloged and then packaged for cold storage.

 

 

 

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J.R. Steffy Collection https://nauticalarch.org/j-r-steffy-collection/ Mon, 29 Feb 2016 21:51:26 +0000 http://nauticalarch.org/?p=7642 In the 1950’s, J.R. Steffy changed the way nautical archaeologists would study ancient ships.  J.R. “Dick” Steffy was a self-taught scholar who turned his hobby of shipbuilding into a lifelong career. The first ship model he built was an ancient Egyptian ship from 1300 BC. It took Steffy 12 years to create this first model. From Steffy’s hobby came the introduction of model ship reconstruction into nautical archaeology. The model is now housed in the INA headquarters along with many of the items used or created by Steffy including: slides, tools, the Egyptian ship model, and original drawings.

Collection Showcase

steffythumbnailJ.R. Steffy’s Toolkit: J.R. Steffy kept his model-making tools in this wooden Bolla wine box.  Tools included this wooden chisel set, model planers, brass shim, and a specially made model hammer.

 

 

 

 

Current Projects

The Egyptian ship model was removed from exhibit on February 27, 2016 to undergo some much needed cleaning.  Years of dust had accumulated on and between the tiny planks.  The model was meticulously cleaned by INAA intern, Jessica Conklin using cotton swabs and dilute isopropyl alcohol.  Some minor repairs to the rigging were also made.  Cleaning was completed that day and the model was replaced on exhibit.

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From the INA Vault https://nauticalarch.org/from-the-ina-vault/ Mon, 29 Feb 2016 21:28:16 +0000 http://nauticalarch.org/?p=7626 This week’s photos from the vault come from the Yassıada Byzantine wreck, reported to journalist Peter Throckmorton in 1958 by a sponge diver from Bodrum.  It was excavated between the years 1961-1964, requiring 3,533 dives. The wreck lay about 32-39 m deep off Yassıada, a small coastal island that caused many ships to wreck in antiquity, and contained a wealth of information about the 7th century A.D. The mapping system, carefully employed by the excavators, provided details about its construction and allowed for a full reconstruction of the ship.

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Photos:

Top Left: Ann Bass holding resin used to make replicas of the anchors from this wreck.  Although the anchors had long since decayed the concretions that formed around them left a hollow mold which could then be filled with resin to reveal the original once the concretion was broken away.

Top Right: George F. Bass inspecting a small artifact while diving on the site.

Bottom Left: Susan Womer (now Katzev) holding an amphora.  Due to resting on the sea bottom, chlorides had permeated the ceramics, these were then removed by placing the amphoras in a fresh water bath until the chloride had been removed.

Bottom Right: The team loads up onto the Virazon to begin the field season.

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Welcome to the INA Archives! https://nauticalarch.org/welcome-to-the-ina-archives/ Sat, 27 Feb 2016 20:43:53 +0000 http://nauticalarch.org/?p=7566

 

The Institute of Nautical Archaeology Archives (INAA) contains a wide range of materials that deal with an expansive range of content from underwater archaeology projects all around the world.  Items in the collection include original manuscripts dating to 1740 all the way up to digital files from current excavations.  In addition to documents, the INAA holds a variety of other materials including silicone molds of artifacts, motion picture film, memorabilia of significant INA figures and more.  The diversity of material types in the INAA collection makes it unique and INA works diligently to ensure its long term preservation and storage.  If you have questions about materials in the INAA collection, please contact INA’s archivist, Meg Hagseth at archivist@nauticalarch.org.

Check back here for regular updates on INAA projects!

J.R. Steffy Collection

From the INA Vault

INA’s Motion Picture Film Collection

 

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